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30th Annual Nonpoint Source Pollution Conference

Since 1990, NEIWPCC, in partnership with its member states, has been coordinating the Annual Nonpoint Source (NPS) Pollution Conference, the premier forum in our region for sharing information and improving communication on NPS pollution issues and projects. This year’s conference is being coordinated in conjunction with NHDES and EPA Region 1.

The conference brings together all those in New England and New York State involved in the management of NPS pollution, including participants from state, federal, and municipal governments, the private sector, academia, and watershed organizations.

This conference has transpired. Thank you to all attendees, exhibitors, sponsors, EPA, and NHDES for making this conference possible!

Please contact James Plummer if you would like to be added to the email blast list for this conference.

AGENDA & MATERIALS

Theme: “30/30 Vision – Breaking through 30 years of barriers, behaviors, and budgets, to blaze the path to the next 30 years of NPS management!”
The theme focuses on the obstacles that have been overcome in the past thirty years and the challenges that the NPS community is tasked with for the next thirty years.
 
Agenda
Attendee List
Presentation Abstracts
Speaker Biographies
 
Not all presentations will be posted below.
Please contact James Plummer with any questions.

 

DAY 1 – THURSDAY, APRIL 18TH

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Harry Stewart, Senior Associate, Normandeau Associates
Mel Cote, Surface Water Branch Chief, US EPA R1
Ted Diers, Administrator, Watershed Management Bureau, NHDES
 

GENERAL SESSION 1

HYDROMODIFICATION
John Magee, NH Fish and Game Department, and Jim MacCartney, National Parks Service
The Nash Stream Restoration Project: restoring riverine processes and connectivity
 
Stephen Landry, NHDES, and Sarah Widing, Inter-Fluve
Resiliency on the Suncook River – Perspective after 13 years of avulsion, analyses, and construction
 

CONCURRENT SESSIONS 2

SOCIAL SCIENCE
James Houle, UNH Stormwater Center
Advancing adoption and implementation of GSI through a Diffusion on Innovation Approach
 
Brian Eisenhauer, Plymouth State University
To Adopt or Not? Using Social Science in Watershed Planning to Promote the Adoption of Residential Best Management Practices
 
Laura Byergo, NH Seacoast Community Volunteer, and Lisa Loosigian, NHDES
Managing a State Soak Up the Rain Program: Creating Capacity and Culture
 
RURAL ROADS
Emily Bird and Jim Ryan, VTDEC, and Catherine Dimitruk, Northwest Regional Planning Commission
From Bennington to Burlington: Bringing Vermont’s Municipal Roads to a Common Standard for Water Quality
 
Jason Sorenson, USGS
Potential nutrient load reduction through municipal leaf management
 
Dana Allen, Watershed Consulting Associates, LLC
Stormwater BMPs for constrained transportation corridors in rural areas – a case study from Vermont’s country roads
 

CONCURRENT SESSIONS 3

COASTAL NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT
Nathaniel Merrill, US EPA Atlantic Ecology Division
When and where to intervene? Coastal nutrient loading, groundwater travel times, and watershed dynamics
 
Kate Mulvaney, US EPA Atlantic Ecology Division
Social Acceptance of Alternative Nutrient-Reduction Technologies in Estuaries
 
Holly Drinkuth and Christopher Clapp, TNC, and Mary Anne Taylor, CDM Smith
Innovative NPS Pollution Management for Coastal Ecosystem Recovery on Long Island and around Long Island Sound: (Suffolk and Westchester County, New York and coastal Connecticut)
 
LAKE WATER QUALITY
Chris Navitsky, The FUND for Lake George
A Model for Protection – Improving Water Quality Through Septic System Management at Lake George, NY
 
Linda Schier, Acton Wakefield Watersheds Alliance, and Sally Soule, NHDES
The Elephant in the Outhouse – Failed Septic Systems and Lake Water Quality
 
Danielle Wain and Charlie Baeder, 7 Lakes Alliance, and Whitney King, Colby College
The East Pond Treatment: a Multi-Stakeholder Approach to Lake Management
 

DAY 2 – FRIDAY, APRIL 19TH

CONCURRENT SESSIONS 4

STORMWATER & GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE
Michelle West and Brian Kuchar, Horsley Witten Group, Inc.
The Designs, They Are A-Changin’: Evolution of Stormwater Designs for Maintenance (Part 1)
 
Matthew Lehman, Horsley Witten Group, Inc.
High performance modular biofiltration systems – overcoming shortfalls of traditional vegetated BMPs (Part 2)
 
Bill Boulanger, City of Dover, NH DPW, and James Houle, UNH Stormwater Center
Every Day Counts – Simpler, more effective and maintainable stormwater innovations from Departments of Public Works
 
SEA LEVEL RISE & CLIMATE RESILIENCE
Lauren Townley, NYS DEC
Offsetting the impacts of climate change on water quality in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed
 
Geoffrey Glover and Brian Laverriere, Horsley Witten Group, Inc.
IT’S ALIVE! Living Shorelines Protecting our Coastal Communities
 
Jayne Knott, UNH, and Sherry Godlewski, NHDES
Potential Water Quality Impacts Associated with Groundwater Rise Caused by Sea-Level Rise
 

GENERAL SESSION 5

319 PROJECT SUCCESSES & FAILURES
Benjamin Lundsted, Comprehensive Environmental, Inc., Jebb Curelop, Baboosic Lake Association, and Jeff Marcoux, NHDES
Brief History of Baboosic BMPs: Overcoming barriers with watershed planning… and Bulldozers. The Baboosic Lake Watershed Restoration Plan and Implementation in Amherst and Merrimack, NH
 
State NPS Coordinators and Project Managers
Arranged by Stephen Landry, NHDES
Battle of the Bads – because NPS project management and implementation is not always sunshine, rainbows, puppies, and unicorns

 
To view information from past Annual NPS Conferences, including the agenda and presentation slides, visit the NPS Conference Archive.

FIELD TRIPS

Two field trips were offered following the conference on Friday, April 19.
 

OPTION 1: Living Shorelines Tour

FROM ARMORED TO LIVING: REINTRODUCING RESILIENCE TO OUR SHORELINES

Kirsten Howard, Coastal Resilience Coordinator, NH Coastal Program, Tom Ballestero, UNH Stormwater Center, and David Burdick, UNH Jackson Estuarine Research Laboratory
This project converted a rip rap shoreline into a fringing salt marsh. Site designs included a seaward “habitat rock” sill, imported soils, and geomorphically consistent metrics (slopes, lengths, drainage, etc.) that account for sea-level rise. The project used living shoreline techniques to restore portions of habitat in Cutts Cove by: 1) enhancing the diversity and quality of approximately 60,000 sq ft of mudflat habitat through addition of native shell substrate; 2) partially removing 200 linear feet of shoreline armoring, creating 5,000 sq. ft. of new tidal marsh and a 3,000 sq. ft. vegetated tidal buffer zone; and 3) creating functional connections among tidal habitats and adjacent upland to provide for habitat migration. A new public park will be built landward of the living shoreline project site and will enable higher visibility and educational opportunities for living shoreline approaches in New Hampshire.

OPTION 2: Strawbery Banke Museum & Gundalow Company’s Sheafe Warehouse

WATER HAS A MEMORY: THE IMPACT OF SEA-LEVEL RISE ON CULTURAL RESOURCES

Jonathan Brown, Director of Visitor Services, and Elizabeth Farish, Chief Curator, Strawbery Banke Museum
Strawbery Banke Museum is an authentic 10-acre outdoor history museum dedicated to bringing 300+ years of American history in a Portsmouth waterfront neighborhood to life. The 10-acre museum campus incorporates the Puddle Dock neighborhood, named for its earliest incarnation as a tidal inlet. Though the inlet was long ago filled, it is among the lowest land points in the city and a natural conduit for draining water. This has offered an opportunity for the museum to partner with the city to take a first look how coastal communities are most vulnerable to impacts from a changing climate and start to plan for resiliency. Attendees toured historic buildings impacted by groundwater rising during extreme high tide events and provided examples of solutions implemented at the museum. more info

CHANGING NATURE – 400 YEARS IN THE PISCATAQUA REGION

Rich Clyborne, Executive Director, and Matt Glenn, Captain, The Gundalow Company
Today, the nonprofit Gundalow Company’s mission “to protect the Piscataqua Region’s maritime heritage and environment through education and action” is more important than ever. Each year, thousands of people spend a few hours sailing onboard the world’s only Piscataqua Gundalow. During our camp and field trip programs, students explore issues like water quality, habitat protection, and stewardship. Our public sail programs include sunset sails, concert sails, speaker sails and more, all with a message that if you experience it – you will care about it, and if you care about it – you will protect it. A recently added exhibition in the Sheafe Warehouse, an historic waterfront warehouse, explores the past, present, and future of the Piscataqua River and Great Bay Estuary through text, images, and interactive displays. Our tour included learning about the Gundalow docked on the Piscatqua River and experiencing the new Sheafe Warehouse exhibit.

EXHIBITORS AND SPONSORS

A huge thank you to our exhibitors and sponsors!

 

ACF Environmental
Beta Analytic Inc.
McIntosh Controls Corp.
Perma-Liner Industries, LLC
FB Environmental Associates, LLC
Granite State Designers & Installers Association
University of New Hampshire Stormwater Center

 

Connect with other attendees on Facebook!
 
For information on local restaurants and attractions, click here.
 
Also, take a look at materials from the National NPS Workshop that took place in early November 2018!

Photo copyright ©EcoPhotography by Jerry Monkman, reproduced with permission.

CONTACT US

James Plummer
NEIWPCC, Lowell MA
978-349-2520